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Kaptkaos
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 Posted - June 03 2022 :  6:54:38 PM Link directly to this topic  Show Profile  Add Kaptkaos to Buddylist
I am looking at casting metal gears to replace the plastic ones on my Tyco power torque motors and I was wondering if anyone knows what metal the pinion gear on the motor shaft is made from? Also what metal is the weights in the engine made from as I might be able to use that to cast the pinion and other gears from as it seems hard enough and doesn't mark when I scratch it with my finger nail like plain lead does. I'm hoping to make gears that will last a lot longer than the plastic ones.
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Chops124
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 Posted - June 03 2022 :  8:27:42 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Chops124 to Buddylist
You are a brave soul, Kapt. Kaos. I think you might find a few buyers
if you can pull this off. My guess it is steel, made from a steel wire
chopped into the length of a shaft. Those pinion gears are the worst
of the worst.
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Kaptkaos
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 Posted - June 03 2022 :  9:49:53 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Kaptkaos to Buddylist
I meant the small metal gear at the end of the motor shaft that links in with the other gears. The one that becomes loose when you take it off and you have to super glue it back on so it doesn't slip. It is defiantly not steel. Thanks for your help.
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Chops124
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 Posted - June 04 2022 :  12:31:59 AM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Chops124 to Buddylist
In my experience, Kapt, that would be the pinion gear. I have never known
a Tyco PT motor to have a brass pinion gear, they were always made with
this cheap plastic that was prone to fracturing. I vainly tried to super glue
my share of those devils. Has anyone ever seen a brass pinion gear, on
any PT motor, Tyco or otherwise?
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Kaptkaos
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 Posted - June 04 2022 :  5:44:41 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Kaptkaos to Buddylist
Hi Chops I get the feeling we may be talking about different parts so I have included a pic to show the parts I am referring to. The pinion gear I am talking about is the small metal gear shown in the pic. I am trying to find out if anyone knows what metal they are made from. I hope this helps everyone in knowing what I am after as I'm not sure what you would call this gear and am only going by what someone else said it was.
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Chops124
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 Posted - June 04 2022 :  5:46:14 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Chops124 to Buddylist
That would be a pinion gear. I believe that to be gray
plastic, not metal, but as always, I could be wrong!
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microbusss
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 Posted - June 04 2022 :  8:06:31 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add microbusss to Buddylist
quote:
That would be a pinion gear. I believe that to be gray
plastic, not metal, but as always, I could be wrong!

Originally posted by Chops124 - June 04 2022 :  5:46:14 PM


yeah & that pinion gear always pops off!
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Crown Vic
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 Posted - June 04 2022 :  8:32:02 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Crown Vic to Buddylist
Yes, the pinion gear is metal. Definitely the weak link among weak links in that gear train as it is notorious for popping off, usually just enough to get out of mesh with the other gears.

I couldn't tell you what kind of metal it is made of, I would assume cheap white metal.

Good luck with your project!
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jward
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 Posted - June 06 2022 :  7:41:04 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add jward to Buddylist
It would be nice to have a source for parts for these units. I always wondered why nobody has 3d printed these the way they have with Bachmann gears. In addition to the gearsets, other parst that are good candidates for 3d printing are the ones commonly missing on used locomotives. Coupler brackets, truck sideframes, handrail stanchions, horns and bells, and the infamous tyco brake wheel to name a few.


Personally, I'd love to see an upgrade kit that would allow you to convert the power torques to all wheel pickup and eliminate the traction tires, and another that would insert into the pilots to convert them to body mounted couplers.

Edited by - jward on June 06 2022 7:43:31 PM
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Rockville
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 Posted - June 08 2022 :  1:20:25 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Rockville to Buddylist
quote:
In my experience, Kapt, that would be the pinion gear. I have never known
a Tyco PT motor to have a brass pinion gear, they were always made with
this cheap plastic that was prone to fracturing. I vainly tried to super glue
my share of those devils. Has anyone ever seen a brass pinion gear, on
any PT motor, Tyco or otherwise?

Originally posted by Chops124 - June 04 2022 :  12:31:59 AM

Yes I have seen a brass pinion gear only on single screw PT.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/225019017413?hash=item34642db8c5:g:s84AAOSwS1xinWup
Ebay listing for reference.
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DaCheez
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 Posted - June 08 2022 :  11:58:58 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Click to see DaCheez's MSN Messenger address  Add DaCheez to Buddylist
quote:
It would be nice to have a source for parts for these units. I always wondered why nobody has 3d printed these the way they have with Bachmann gears. In addition to the gearsets, other parst that are good candidates for 3d printing are the ones commonly missing on used locomotives. Coupler brackets, truck sideframes, handrail stanchions, horns and bells, and the infamous tyco brake wheel to name a few.

Originally posted by jward - June 06 2022 :  7:41:04 PM



The pinion gear is probably printable, but would it hold up? I assume there's a reason why it's the only gear Tyco made out of metal. The other things you listed should all be doable. I've printed horns and couplers in the past.
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Chops124
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 Posted - June 09 2022 :  12:32:27 AM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Chops124 to Buddylist
TBH, I once went so far as taking my crummy old Tyco '76 to the
repair shop at Caboose Hobbies in Denver. The guy did raise an
eyebrow, but provided me with a pinion and a spare. I will swear
up and down that it was a cheap gray plastic. This is the first I hear
of it ever being metal!
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scsshaggy
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 Posted - June 09 2022 :  10:08:33 AM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add scsshaggy to Buddylist
Generally, when gears are made of different materials, the harder material is in the gear that gets the most wear. That tiny pinion gear goes around several times for each revolution of the much larger gear it engages. A metal pinion gear and the rest of the gears being plastic would be logical. I have no power-torque locomotives to check, so what's really there is for those of you who have them to resolve.

Regarding the original post and casting a new gear from the metal in the weight, that could get tricky. First, the weight is most likely Zamac and that has to be very pure because zinc pest is caused by impurities. I don't know if a home hobbyist could keep it so pure. Second, when you make a casting, the molten metal is, of course, hot and will cool and contract a bit after it hardens. If you use the original gear as your pattern, then the question arises: how much smaller will the duplicate be? Will it be within tolerances or small enough not to mesh right?

If this kind of experimenting is the fun of the hobby, then you're not out anything by trying, but if it's all a lot like work, you could end up disappointed.

It can be difficult to tell what you least expect the most.
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jward
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 Posted - June 09 2022 :  10:29:55 AM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add jward to Buddylist
Linotype metal doesn't shrink as it cools. It has antimony in it which expands as it cools and counteracts the other metals in the alloy. But I doubt it's hard enough to make a gear out of. WHen I ran a letterpress, we'd only get about 5-10 thousand impressions out of it before it wore out and we had to recast it.

But it might offer a clue to something that would work. Look for a metal alloy with antimony and a low melting point to start, then factor in hardness and durability.
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Kaptkaos
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 Posted - June 15 2022 :  4:55:58 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Kaptkaos to Buddylist
Thanks Rockville after seeing that I remember seeing a brass one myself years ago so it could be a possible metal to use. I will look into that as I was thinking if I should use brass but didn't know if it had a low melt point like white metal.
Hi Chops as far as I know all the Tyco PT motored engines I've seen have had the metal pinon gear on them and I only know of 2 that had brass ones but I can see where someone might have made a plastic one at some time as a replacement. I don't think they would have lasted long but still long enough to get some good use out of them. Thanks for your help and encouragement with this.
Hi jward thanks for the suggestion with the linotype metal I will defiantly look into it. If I can find a metal alloy with antimony in it I will give it a try. It would be good if it could last for 5-10 thousand hours.
scsshaggy I was only wondering if I could use a metal weight from the trains but after hearing what you had to say I think it would be best not to go that rout as I could end up with more trouble than I bargained for. I am going to have to find a metal that does not shrink much to get this to work I think.
Thanks everyone you have given me a great deal of help so far and a lot to work with that I wouldn't have known about otherwise. Hopefully I can work something out.
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Chops124
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 Posted - June 15 2022 :  7:43:28 PM Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Add Chops124 to Buddylist
900 to 940 ¬įC, 1,650 to 1,720 ¬įF, depending on composition) and its flow characteristics make it a relatively easy material to cast.

(Wikepedia)
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